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20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Apr 22, 2013 11:00pm PDT
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
MSNBC
Apr 21, 2013 5:00am PDT
. >> there's been a lot of attention paid to the fact miranda rights were not immediately read to him. governor patrick said in the opening, said last night, the suspect is not in condition to talk at this moment. is there any indication how long they can go before having to read miranda rights to him if they are going to get the chance to interrogate him without the warning, without access to a lawyer? >> reporter: a very good question. one that i think is likely to be litigated. now what the justice department is saying that they want to use this special high-value interrogation team to question him without reading him his miranda rights, under the public safety exception. and the -- question and that has been defined as 48 hours. they have 48 hours to question him before they read him his rights. now, the aclu and the federal public defenders office here in boston which says -- said yesterday they expect to represent tsarnaev. they are challenging that and saying that they -- the government may be stretching it here. and, frankly, actually, the longer this goes on, the longer that
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)